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A reader asked:

I'm putting together a D7000 rig for video shooting and I was wondering what the best approach to audio equipment would be?
My budget is about $450 and I am going to travel to Indonesia to shoot a pilot for a TV travel show.  I was thinking a Zoom recorder (not sure which was is the best), but also a wireless lavalier system so I can be mobile.
I was hoping to record the video with the Zoom for ambient sound while having the lavalier for subject audio.

On first glance, $450 for a complete DSLR audio kit seems too low. I mean, you can easily spend that much on a single professional microphone.

Then I started working through what you'd really need. It turned out that you could put together an pretty decent audio kit for $450.

Here's what I found.

[click to continue…]

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If you're shooting video with a DSLR, chances are you're going to want a small shotgun mic in your kit. With all the choices on the market it's hard to know which one is right for you.

Chad Johnson has solved this problem for you – Shootout of the Mini Shotguns! [click to continue…]

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Rode has a new shotgun microphone designed for DSLR cameras – the VideoMic Pro.

Rode VideoMic Pro from Team Digital on Vimeo.

It sounds great, is much smaller and you won't have to keep a supply of rubber shockmounts on hand. (The original VideoMic uses small rubber shock mounts that get easily lost.)

Here are other key points about this great mic:
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A reader asked:

I'm putting together a D7000 rig for video shooting and I was wondering what the best approach to audio equipment would be?
My budget is about $450 and I am going to travel to Indonesia to shoot a pilot for a TV travel show.  I was thinking a Zoom recorder (not sure which was is the best), but also a wireless lavalier system so I can be mobile.
I was hoping to record the video with the Zoom for ambient sound while having the lavalier for subject audio.

On first glance, $450 for a complete DSLR audio kit seems too low. I mean, you can easily spend that much on a single professional microphone.

Then I started working through what you'd really need. It turned out that you could put together an pretty decent audio kit for $450. Here's what I found.

[click to continue…]

{ 0 comments }

As they say on this site, audio is 70% of what you see. Most of the focus of the DSLR video world is about the camera and lenses but – like DSLR camera manufacturers – most people give too little time to the audio side.

I've said it before and I'll say it again. The fastest, lowest cost way to increase the production value of your project is to improve the sound track.

This program will help you do just that.

[click to continue…]

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One of the best ways to increase the production value of your DSLR video is to record great audio. Here's a short video that will help you record better audio whether you use a lavalier or a shotgun microphone. This post on my DSLR video blog has tons of comments – the video really helps you understand which mic to choose.

[click to continue…]

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Which microphone is right for you? Guy Cochran, of dvestore.com, has created a solid microphone comparison. Shot on a Canon 5D, he uses a professional multitrack field recorder in a noisy environment with everything from a lavalier to hypercardoid to shotgun microphones.

Watch after the link. [click to continue…]

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